Davis Millimeter-Wave Research Center

Microwave/Millimeter Wave Technology

Plasma Diagnostics

 

 

RESEARCH  ACTIVITIES

Plasma diagnostics

 

µ-wave vacuum electronics

 

µ-wave solid state technology

 

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Director:
Prof. N.C. Luhmann, Jr.

 

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Academic Surge Building

 

 

The Davis Millimeter Wave Research Center (DMRC) was founded in 2008 by Prof. N.C. Luhmann together with Prof. Anh-Vu Pham as an industry university cooperative research program. The DMRC is broadly focused on fostering millimeter wave technology for wireless communications, radar, sensing, and imaging systems. The activities in the DMRC range from devices, integrated circuits, components and packaging, sub-systems to system implementation.

The DMRC is housed in the Academic Surge building, which includes office space for the research and development staff, cubicles for the graduate students as well as office space for visiting scholars. The DMRC office area also includes a dedicated computer facility and tele- and video-conferencing center (see Fig. 1) adjacent to the office space assigned to the staff.

Tele- and video-conferencing capabilities are made possible through Polycom Viewstation 128 system. The Polycom Viewstation 128 supports streaming video both to other viewstation systems as well as to web-based browsers. This unit transmits at a rate of 15 frames per second using a voice-tracking camera which focuses automatically on the speaker. A 360° microphone pod provides full room audio coverage with built-in echo cancella­tion and noise suppression circuitry. Similar viewstation systems exist at PPPL and GA, and have been utilized for both 2-way and 3-way video-conferencing between these institutions. A webcam and microphone are also available for videoconferencing via Skype with those institutions that do not have H.264 video conferencing compatible hardware.

 

 

 

    

 

Fig 1. DMRC workstation facility (left) and conferencing center (right).

 

 

 

 

 

Computing Facilities

 

The group possesses considerable microwave circuit/structure design and simulation capability that plays a major role in the group's technology developments. Workstations include: Multiple Intel quad-core systems built for speed and reliability to allow quick design and virtual prototyping capabilities, multiple dual processor Intel Zeon servers to handle complex field and PIC simulations, and a high speed gigabit network with a dedicated Web/FTP server to facilitate quick exchange of files and ideas between researchers.

 

Each workstation is outfitted with commercial 2D and 3D software including: Ansoft HFSS for 3-D electromagnetic-field simulation, CST Microwave Studio, Ansoft Designer for high-performance RF/MMW design & analog verification, Maxwell 3D for magnetic field simulations and the powerful ADS simulation package for microwave circuit analysis. Other design and simulation tools include IE3D for imaging antennas and wide bandwidth electronics, Quickwave for quasi-optical filters and beam splitters, CodeV for FIReTIP and high-k scattering optics with Gaussian beam propagation analysis, Matlab and IDL for numerical analysis and visualization, and Spectre/SPICE and OrCAD/PSPICE for analog electronic circuit simulation.

In addition to our extensive workstation collection, the DMRC also has a dedicated 64core AMD Cluster (see Figure 2) for advanced Magic 2D and 3D PIC simulations. The AMD cluster allows the DMRC to simulate complex RF systems with unprecedented accuracy and speed; Intense Magic simulations that would otherwise take a month to complete using an advanced workstation are reduced to a matter of days, allowing faster “Design to Implementation”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 2. The 64-core AMD Cluster. Individual units are contained in a specially cooled

custom rack-mount system to allow thermal reliability as well as a compact footprint.

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
              
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